Month: June 2018

Two days prior to this article being published I sent one out about the popular fallacy that nitrogen “absorbs” moisture. That tech tip went out at 7 PM eastern time like usual, and I was sitting on the couch watching something on the Food network (like usual).

At 7:10 PM I get a call on my cell and I look down to see the name Jim Bergmann displayed boldly on my screen. Whenever this happens it means only one thing… Jim read my tech tip and he has something to say about it.

“What did I say wrong THIS TIME” I mumble sarcastically into my iPhone

It turns out it wasn’t what I said, but rather, what I had forgotten to say that cause Jim to speed read, then speed dial.

So this tech tip is really Jim’s, even though my hands are the ones typing the words. He had a really good point to make about sweeping nitrogen BEFORE pressurizing with nitrogen.

Air is mostly made up of nitrogen, oxygen, argon and water vapor. The nitrogen and argon are inert and while we don’t want much of them inside a refrigeration system they don’t react with the oil, refrigerant, and metals in the system like oxygen and water vapor can (and often do).

When we call nitrogen “dry nitrogen” we just mean that it is nitrogen vapor alone with no water vapor or oxygen mixed with it. When we flow nitrogen at 2-5 SCFH during brazing we are displacing the air or “atmosphere” with nitrogen that contains no oxygen or water vapor that cause the nasty flakes of carbon to build up.

Before we start flowing at low levels we should first Purge or “Sweep” the system with nitrogen so that all the air is displaced out, to begin with. This should be done at a reasonable low pressure of 3-5 PSIG to help ensure that we don’t condense the moisture in the system into liquid water.

Let’s take a quick pause there… You may ask

Why on earth would pressurizing the system with nitrogen lead to liquid water condensation?

This occurs for the same reason that water condenses inside an air compressor. When you squeeze together those water vapor molecules with pressure the dew point temperature increases… until finally, it condenses into liquid water inside the system.

By sweeping the system with low-pressure nitrogen for 30 seconds or so you help displace and carry out that air and it’s water vapor with it before it has a chance to condense. Then you flow nitrogen while brazing, finally you are ready to pressure test.

What if you did no brazing?

In cases where you opened a system and only made repairs to threaded fittings, or used a low-temperature solder that doesn’t require flowing or installed a ductless or VRF system that has no brazed connections or used Zoomlock…

In that case, you would still want to do the nitrogen sweep BEFORE you pressure test. This will help decrease your evacuation time and keep your pump oil cleaner, longer.

So there you have it… from Jim’s mind to my ears, to this article, to your brain. Pretty good stuff.

— Bryan

 

I got a lot of comments that many of you discharge run capacitors with a volt meter. I test this method vs. the capacitor discharge tool I created.

Obviously many of you use needle nose pliers or a screwdriver. While this is widely practiced it could result in an arc, shock and/or damage to the capacitor.

Others have also mentioned that some meters have a Low-Z mode which is used for low impedance voltage measurement. This mode would discharge the capacitor more quickly than the volt meter shown.

Click the video to see the result.

–Bryan

How does a typical motor know how fast to run?

Typical induction motors are slaves of the electrical cycle rate of the entering power (measured in hertz ).

Our power in the US makes one full rotation from positive electrical peak to negative peak 60 times per second or 60hz (50hz in many other countries)

This means that the generators at the power plant would have to run at 3600 RPM if they only had two poles of power 2 poles (60 cycles per second x 60 seconds per minute = 3600 rotations per minute) in reality, power plants generators can run at different speeds depending on the number of magnetic poles within the generator. This phenomenon is replicated in motor design.

The more “poles” you have in a motor the shorter the distance the motor needs to turn per cycle.

In a 2 pole motor it rotates all the way around every cycle, making the no-load speed of 2 pole motor in the US 3600 RPM.

A 4 pole motor only goes half the way around per cycle, this makes the no-load (Syncronous) RPM 1800

6 pole is 1200 no load (no slip)

8 pole is 900 no load (no slip)

So when you see a motor rated at 1075 RPM, it is a 6 pole motor with some allowance for load and slip.

An 825 RPM motor is an 8 pole motor with some allowance for slip.

A multi-tap / multi-speed single phase motor may have three or more “speed taps” on the motor. These taps just add additional winding resistance between run and common to increase the motor slip and slow the motor.

This means  a 1075, 6 pole motor will run at 1075 RPM under rated load at high speed. Medium speed will have greater winding resistance than the high speed and therefore greater slip. Low speed will have a greater winding resistance than medium and have an even greater slip.

Variable speed ECM (Electronically commutated motor) are motors that are powered by a variable frequency. In essence the motor control takes the incoming electrical frequency and converts it to a new frequency (cycle rate) that no longer needs to be 60hz. This control over the actual frequency is what makes ECM motors so much more variable in ten speeds they can run.

So in summary. There are three way you can change a motor speed.

  • Change the # of poles (more = slower)
  • Increase slip to make it slower, decrease slip to bring it closer to synchronous speed
  • Alter the frequency (cycle rate)

— Bryan

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